Tours and attractions

Uncover the hidden stories of Townsville’s military past, embark on a hike which will leave you inspired, or head out on the water for a magical encounter with the wildlife of the Great Barrier Reef. With so much on offer, you’ll quickly fill your Townsville North Queensland holiday itinerary.  

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Adrenalin Snorkel and Dive

Adrenalin Snorkel and Dive is one of Townsville's longest established dive training and marine tourism operators. They specialise in providing snorkelling and diving trips as well as training of divers as part of a full dive service. Join them today and dive the spectacular SS Yongala Wreck, or snorkel and dive the Great Barrier Reef. The SS Yongala Wreck is one of Australia's best dive sites! The Yongala Wreck is a national historical wreck that lies within Great Barrier Reef Marine Park. The wreck begins at 14 metres below the surface and sits on a sandy bottom at 29 metres. The artefacts, marine life and variety of corals that cover the wreck are spectacular. This is a must do dive for all certified divers! Or visit the pristine Lodestone Reef located on the Great Barrier Reef with their friendly and professional crew. Their day trip is a perfect way to enjoy unlimited snorkelling, introductory scuba dives or two certified dives. Both snorkelers and divers will be exhilarated witnessing the spectacular marine life that Lodestone has to offer whilst being immersed in tropical crystal clear water.

Adventure Australia Treks and Tours

Adventure Australia operate premium Four Wheel Drive tours to almost anywhere in this great country. From the rugged beauty of Cape York, to the pristine beaches of Fraser Island or the stunning deserts of Central Australia, their experience and guidance ensures a memorable trip. They're proud of their small group tours and love to share the unique aspects of every tour itinerary with clients. Whether it's the outback, rainforests or beaches that Australia has to offer, they can take you. A team of dedicated staff, pride themselves on creating intimate Four Wheel Drive Adventure Tours tailored to provide the most meaningful experiences possible. Your tour can be as action packed or as relaxed as you'd like. Their fleet of Four Wheel Drives are modern and are specifically equipped to provide comfort, safety and accessibility to remote areas off the beaten track. This means you get to skip the cramped and noisy tourist buses. The company provides 'premium fully inclusive tours' that provide flexibility in itineraries and also allow clients to participate in the Four Wheel Driving. The 'tag-along tours' provide an option for clients to bring their own vehicles. The tours cater for couples, small groups, families and corporate clients.

Alva Beach

Alva is a relaxed Burdekin location, 15 minutes drive from Ayr. Holiday houses and permanent residences fill the township, with Alva Beach a short stroll over the sand dune. A lookout area is located to the right as you enter the township. At low tide Alva Beach makes for excellent exploring, with lots of small crabs, shells and birdlife. Outer sand bars create inshore lagoon areas popular with kite surfers on weekends. The beach is also popular for fishing, with many anglers bringing in decent catches to show off. On weekends during summer, the beach is patrolled by members of the Ayr Surf Life Saving Club. Located here since 1926, the club is one of North Queensland's oldest surf clubs. Care needs to be taken if swimming, due to changeable conditions and marine stingers. Alva's Yongala Dive operates a Dive Shop and accommodation, specialising in PADI dive courses, with day trips out to the SS Yongala wreck. This world renowned dive is one of the best on the Great Barrier Reef. Alva Beach Tourist Park has a kiosk. If you're spending the day at Alva, bring a picnic or barbecue lunch to enjoy in the park near the surf club.

Anzac Park, Ayr

At the top of Anzac Park, the Ayr War Memorial takes pride of place. It commemorates those who died in service in various theatres of war including the First and Second World Wars, and Korean and Vietnam Wars. A rotunda is situated nearby. The all-abilities playground in Anzac Park has a variety of playground equipment, and is fully fenced. This is a fantastic place to let the children shake off a car trip, use up some energy, and get some fresh air. Stretch out and watch the kids enjoy themselves. The Sway Fun Swing allows children in wheelchairs to join in the fun. Only one street back from Ayr's main street, there are plenty of nearby meal outlets and cafes. Bring a picnic for the family, or use the sheltered barbecues.

Aquascene Charters - Magnetic Island

Established 12 years ago, Aquascene is a family owned and operated tour business that specialise in friendly, informative, personalised tours that combine snorkelling, fishing and exploring beautiful Magnetic Island. Come and join Aquascene on a half day tour and experience a lifetime of local knowledge and "secret" spots as they share with you this beautiful Island they have called home for over 30 years. Discover secluded beaches and bays, get up close to the stunning "Granite Boulder" headlands and snorkel beautiful fringing coral reefs. Benefit from expert tuition for snorkelling in a safe and comfortable environment from people that understand individual needs. Your Skipper is also a fully qualified Life Guard. Small group sizes ensure a very personalised experience, catering for everyone, from families to the very young and the elderly. They are also suitable for guests who may have mobility challenges. Aquascene's comfortable boat provides plenty of shade, easy access stairs in and out of the water and a toilet/change room. There are no long travel times, just plenty of fun and relaxation. From the moment you arrive, to the moment you leave you will be looked after by the friendly caring team that Aquascene are renowned for.

Arcadia at Magnetic Island

Arcadia is perfectly situated in the smallest of the four main bays on Magnetic Island, and is surrounded by the prominent Alma Bay and Geoffrey Bay. Geoffrey Bay is a Marine National Park Zone - which means no fishing or collecting - but is great for exploring during low tide. The old barge jetty is a great spot for feeding rock wallabies at dusk. Alma Bay is a very popular swimming spot for local and visitors alike. The Arcadian Life Saving Club patrols the beach on weekends and public holidays. Public amenities include a gas barbecue, picnic tables, shaded children's playground, changing areas and toilets. Alma Bay is famous for its ANZAC Day Commemorations. Real-life soldiers from the Thirty-Fifth Field Squadron (Reservist Engineers) annually re-enact the events that took place and make a dawn landing right on the beach.

Big Mama Sailing

Big Mama Sailing is owned and operated by a small family (Stu, Lisa, Fletcher and boat dog Coco). They offer a personalised and memorable sailing experience. They are based in Horseshoe Bay, Magnetic Island but are happy to pick up and drop off at Breakwater Marina, Townsville for private and large group bookings. Bring your own alcohol is welcome. Big Mama is a beautiful and well maintained Adams Ketch. They live on board, so they are welcoming you into their home. Big Mama has plenty of deck space to relax in a bean bag, read a book in the comfortable inside saloon or join in the fun and action of sailing. All meals and food are freshly prepared on board and are delicious, wholesome and plentiful. Big Mama is an unforgettable experience..

Billabong Sanctuary

Billabong Sanctuary offers Australia’s Best Interactive Wildlife Experience! Located just 20 minutes south of Townsville on the Bruce Highway, they feature native animals in natural habitats of eucalypt forest, rainforest and wetlands. As a small boutique park we specialize in memorable personal experiences: Cuddle a koala, pat a wombat, pose with a python, pat a dingo, and feed the cassowaries. You could even hold a baby saltwater crocodile! Free-ranging kangaroos will hop up for a pat. Most interactive experiences are free-of-charge and you can use your own camera to capture the moment. They are one of the few places in the country where you can hold a koala for a souvenir photo! This dream-come true experience takes place twice a day, morning and afternoon, so you won’t miss out. Twice-daily croc-feeding shows are thrilling to watch, as these mighty reptiles power out of the water to snatch their food. Throughout the day friendly Rangers present dynamic and impassioned talks, which are both inspiring and entertaining. Our focus on conservation has earned us Advanced Ecotourism Accreditation.

Brandon Heritage Precinct

If your interests include machinery or history, make sure you visit the Brandon Heritage Precinct. With plenty on display, the complex is the base of the Burdekin Machine Preservationists. This group of machinery enthusiasts are happy to welcome visitors to view their collection of machinery, tractors and other relevant items of interest. The Brandon Heritage Precinct contains a Workshop area, Steam Shed and Blacksmith Shop and displays a collection of machinery that was used in the Burdekin District. The Burdekin Machine Preservationists have completed their restoration project of a 1910 Marshall C Class Tractor. This tractor, which is on display at the complex, is the only one of its class left in the world. Tours can be taken through the complex on Mondays between 9am and 4pm when the Burdekin Machine Preservationists are in attendance. Suggested entry is gold coin donation. They have a wealth of mechanical knowledge, so feel free to ask lots of questions.

Broadwater, Abergowrie State Forest

In the scenic Herbert River Valley, Abergowrie State Forest features tropical rainforest, open eucalypt forest and exotic pine plantations adjacent to the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Broadwater is a large grassy clearing, shaded by tall eucalypts, beside a cool waters of Broadwater Creek. Set up camp beside the creek and relax in the peaceful surrounds. Book camping well in advance for holiday periods. Stroll along the 1.6 kilometre return Rainforest walk through endangered riparian rainforest and check out the huge old Broadwater fig. Try the longer 3 kilometre return Creek walk through eucalypt and riparian forest to the delightful pools along Broadwater Creek. Cool off with a swim in the pools in the creek. Birdwatch in the rainforest and look for wallabies in the open forest in the afternoons.

Burdekin Diorama

The Burdekin Diorama provides a shady location to stretch your legs and discover the Burdekin's rich heritage. Easy to stop into, and interesting to find, you'll enjoy the diorama's surrounds. The Burdekin delta sits atop an amazing resource: the aquifer, a ground source of fresh water. Replenished by the Burdekin River, this managed system is explained through maps, photos, diagrams and charts at the Burdekin Diorama. Excellent resources and hard working people are what it takes to make a region prosper. The Burdekin district knows the good fortune of both. Some of the facts and figures are surprising! The local sugar cane industry, with its original hand cane cutters, is important to understanding the area's history and prosperity. The Burdekin Diorama helps get a glimpse into the journey of the Burdekin's sugar cane industry. Five recently installed stainless steel panels shine a further light on people, events and work, which impacted the region's history. You'll find the Burdekin Diorama near Home Hill's Inkerman Sugar Mill, on the southern side of the Burdekin River Bridge. The Burdekin Diorama is just over an hours drive south of Townsville.

Burdekin River Bridge

The Burdekin River Bridge is the district's best known landmark. Locally known as the Silver Link, it is a road and rail bridge which also has a pedestrian walkway. The bridge makes an excellent subject for architectural photos or a great location for holiday snaps. Taking 10 years to complete, the bridge was opened in 1957. It replaced a low level traffic bridge and a rail bridge. Remnants of the old rail bridge can be seen just downstream from the Burdekin River Bridge. Visitors wanting to experience walking across the Burdekin River Bridge are asked to park near the Burdekin Diorama. This is on the southern side of the bridge. You can then walk along the pedestrian walkway onto the bridge. During the crushing (sugar cane harvesting season) this gives you a good view over the sugar cane bins in the holding yard of the Inkerman Sugar Mill. For more detailed information on the Burdekin River Bridge, see the Burdekin Diorama, or call into the Gateway Visitor Information Centre in Home Hill.

Cape Pallarenda Conservation Park

Set in a scenic coastal location amongst open woodland and vine thickets, this park features an historic quarantine station, established in 1915. The station was initially used to quarantine passengers on incoming ships. During World War II the area was a strategic defence location. American and Australian armies set up camps on nearby beaches and used the Quarantine Station as a hospital. Walk or mountain bike the shared trails throughout the park to see the World War II structures on the Cape Pallarenda headland and explore the beaches and forested slopes of Many Peak Range. Enjoy a picnic on the foreshore. Look for wallabies, lizards and many kinds of birds in the woodland. Find out more about the quarantine days at the station's historic display.

Castle Hill

Just metres short of a mountain, Castle Hill is the giant pink granite monolith that stands proud in the centre of Townsville - a perfect place for visitors to orientate themselves. As well as offering vehicle access, Castle Hill provides a number of popular walking tracks, which are frequented by more than 2,500 locals a day! The 360-degree views of Townsville at the top are well worth the journey. Be sure to have a camera on hand, particularly for sunrise or sunset as these are photo opportunities which shouldn't be missed. As well as offering an iconic centre piece for the city and spectacular scenic views, Castle Hill has a significant history. The Hill's vantage was used by visiting American soldiers during World War II. According to local legend, the visitors famously offered to demolish the hill and use the rock to build a bridge to Magnetic Island. A World War II observation bunker sits on one corner of the Hill reminding visitors of Castle Hill's military history. Castle Hill facilities include car parking, public amenities, drink fountains and shaded seating to enjoy while taking in some of the best views of the city and across to Magnetic Island.

CastleTown Shoppingworld

You're invited to their modern, clean, air conditioned shopping centre situated right in the Townsville greater Central Business District. Shopping is easy at CastleTown. The centre has an easy-to-manouevre layout, with over 150 stores, including Woolworths Supermarket, Target, Big W, Best and Less, Cotton On Mega Store and the Reject Shop to choose from during your visit to their northern Australian city. CastleTown is home to a wealth of fashion and accessory stores to suit men, women, children and babies. You’ll find all manner of fashion from denim to designer wear. The centre also has several stores that specialise in plus size fashion. The centre has several jewellery stores, optical and sunglasses stores, handbag stores, along with major discount department stores to cater to all of your fashion and accessory needs. While you’re there you can also indulge in a facial, massage or other beauty and hair service from one of their many beauty and hair salons. CastleTown also has a fabulous array of homewares available, along with six banks, a Travelex outlet, Travel Money Oz, Australia Post, two travel agents and a great selection of food court outlets, cafe's and restaurants to choose from. Enjoy!

Centenary Park

Step back in time to the days of the gold rush when you visit Centenary Park in Charters Towers. This popular park space features a gold discovery monument and a collection of sculptures created by Queensland Artist, Hugh Anderson. Make sure you take a picture of the Bat Statue created and designed as part of the 2013 LATTE Exhibition. Centenary Park features an interesting history, with the area first announced for public purposes in 1888. In 1941 the last Gazette Order in Council set aside the area as a reserve for park purposes and named it "Sayers Park" after Robert John Sayers. From the city's very early days, Centenary Park was called "Harvey's Reserve", no doubt because Joseph Harvey, a local butcher, built and lived in "Tower Villa", an old Queenslander style home that still faces out over the north east corner of the Reserve. During 1972 the Park was re-named "Centenary Oval" as part of the city's centenary celebrations. Centenary Park features picnic tables, toilets, gas barbecues, a children's playground, liberty swing, lit walking tracks and is always cool and shady.

Central Village

Central Village showcases sidewalk cafes, open air dining, a pedestrian plaza, as well as abundant patron car parking. It's an ideal location to start your night out or take the family for dinner and movie. Central Village Includes: Birch Carroll and Coyle Cinemas, Max Brenner Chocolate Shop, Hog's Breath Cafe, Guzman Y Gomez, Relish Cafe, Reds Salon, Fratello Coffee, Snap Fitness.

Charlie's Hill

Constructed by the RAAF in 1943, the No 211 Radar Station on Charlie’s Hill was one of twenty radar installations along the North Queensland coastline. These operated to give an early warning of approaching enemy aircraft during World War II. When visiting this historic site, igloos of reinforced concrete which provided bomb-proof protection for the radar equipment can still be seen. The wooden towers which supported the transmitting and receiving aerials have been removed. However, foundations from various structures near the igloos may still be found. The buildings are listed in the Queensland Heritage Register because of the site’s historical and military significance. Charlie’s Hill is a six minute drive south of Home Hill. Travelling along the Bruce Highway, look for the signs on the left, just after Iyah Creek. Turn onto Charlie’s Hill Road and travel about 1.5 kilometres, until the hill is visible on the right. The access to the hill from the road is an unsealed track. The site is maintained by the Burdekin Shire Council.

Charters Towers Cemetery

Charters Towers Cemetery was established in 1895. It is the resting place for a number of interesting local characters including Jupiter Mosman who, as local lore has it, was part of the party that discovered gold at Charters Towers; Doctor Leonard Redmond who discovered Australian dengue fever; Fredrick Pfeiffer owner of the rich Day Dawn PC Mine and James Knenniff who was the last bushranger in Queensland. The Charters Towers Visitor Information Centre has the cemetery records for both the Pioneer and Charters Towers cemeteries. If it is family history you are seeking, why not contact the Charters Towers and Dalrymple Archives Group or the Charters Towers Family History Association Incorporated? These groups aim to promote and preserve research into local and family history for the benefit of the community.

City Lane Townsville

The dining scene in Townsville North Queensland has come alive with Townsville's first creative laneway precinct, City Lane, offering a bevy of dining options to tempt everyone's taste buds. City Lane is a sophisticated, New York inspired precinct complete with street art, funky décor and an atmosphere to match! The City Lane precinct truly is the day to night dining solution. The seamless combination of a somewhat contrasting collection of bars and eateries just works! City Lane has brought sophistication, vibrancy and style into the heart of Townsville City and is a 'must visit' while in Townsville North Queensland. Dining options within City Lane include: Paleo Cafe, Shaw and Co, Donna Bionda, The Courtyard and Sakana.

Dalrymple National Park

Ancient lava flows, fossilised limestone and the Burdekin River, the largest river in Queensland, are features of this park in the Charters Towers area. Mount Keelbottom rises 130 metres above the surrounding plain and part of the old Dalrymple township site can be found in the park. It was one of the first inland settlements in northern Australia and has links with the discovery of gold in the area in the mid-1800s. Parts of the township are privately owned. Please respect private property signs. In the dry season, bush camp along the sandy edges of the Burdekin River. Explore the undeveloped walking trails that follow the river and Fletcher Creek, and discover basalt flows and a peaceful riverside setting. Longer hikes to Mount Keelbottom should only be undertaken by well-equipped and experienced walkers. Watch waterbirds from the river's edge. Ride trail-bikes and mountain bikes on the internal roads through the park.

Dalrymple Sales Yards - Cattle Sales

Experience the thrill of a live cattle auction, held every Wednesday at the Dalrymple Sales Yards. The Charters Towers region is the largest cattle producing Local Government area in Australia with beef produced on 250 commercial properties running around 600000 head of cattle collectively. Dalrymple Sales Yards sell over 100000 head of store and prime cattle per annum and host North Queensland's premier bull and horse sales. The quality of the animals sold through the Dalrymple Sales Yards is evidenced by the recent sale of a bull which fetched a record price of AUD145000.

Dan Gleeson Memorial Gardens

Throw down a picnic rug and relax by one of the many water features Dan Gleeson Memorial Gardens offers while spotting the array of wildlife nearby. These lush gardens are home to a diverse range of wildlife, from long neck turtles, mangrove jack, barramundi, eels, redclaw and prawns to bowerbirds, barking owls, fig birds, ducks, cormorants, egrets, butterflies and a range of beetles and lizards. Whether you are walking the dog or taking the kids out for a ride on their bikes or scooters, Dan Gleeson Memorial Gardens has a number of well maintained walking paths set amongst gorgeous scenery that is perfect for an afternoon stroll. Dan Gleeson Memorial Gardens offers ample parking, wheelchair access and barbecue facilities.

Fishing at Magnetic Island

Magnetic Island is an angler's dream with a catch virtually guaranteed! Sit back, throw in a line and enjoy the rush of reeling in your latest bite. What a catch it can be; 22-pound Coral Trout and 44-pound Spanish Mackerel are among the trophies happy fishermen have taken home. If you want to gain some local insight, take a fishing tour. This is also a great option to explore areas only accessible by boat. Alternatively, head to one of the local stores and grab some fresh bait to try your luck at one of the beaches, rocky points and inshore waters. In these spots you are likely to discover bream, flathead, whiting, queen fish and trevally; not to mention the incredible beach views and rocky settings the environment offers. Head to Nobby Head, the rocks of Bright Point or the Picnic Bay Jetty for some of the best fishing locations. If you have a boat some of the best fishing spots around Magnetic Island include Middle Reef, West Point, Orchard Rocks and Palmosa and Argonant wrecks near Horseshoe Bay. Boats are available for hire if required and boat ramps are located in Picnic, Nelly and Horseshoe Bays.

Fishing on Hinchinbrook Island

Discover an island with a Jurassic outlook which abounds in flora, fauna, palm fringed beaches and extensive mangrove lined waterways. Hinchinbrook Island offers extensive flats and channel systems which are home to many prime tropical sportfish. This region boasts one of the few places in Australia where that much prized fly fishing adversary, the Permit (Snub Nosed Dart), can be targeted with some level of anticipation. Fishing with the majestic backdrop of Hinchinbrook Island is spectacular enough, but to be able to target good quality sportfish including barramundi, mangrove jacks, trevally, queenfish, salmon, fingermark, grunter and cod, makes this a fishing experience you'll never forget. Due to the magnificent mangrove environment, relative isolation in comparison to waters closer to Cairns and the lack of fishing pressure, this region is renowned for producing quality sportfish that are of a better average size than more heavily fished locations. The surrounding areas of Lucinda and Cardwell also offer great land based fishing with Duncan Wharf, Lucinda Wharf, Taylor's and Forrest Beaches being popular hot spots.

Flinders Street Shopping

Make your way down Townsville's Flinders Street and discover local clothing designers, eclectic souvenirs and gifts, beauty options and a wide array of café and dining options. City Arcade is a new edition to the Flinders Street shopping collection, offering a selection of creative, alternative boutiques alongside sophisticated convenience service offerings.

Forrest Beach

Escape life's hustle and bustle and spend some time relaxing on Forrest Beach. Enjoy the long sandy beach front which overlooks Orpheus Island and the Palm Island group, or take a swim in the patrolled beach which also features stinger net protection during the summer months. Forrest Beach has a hotel/motel, caravan park and self-contained units. There are a small number of shops where essential items can be purchased.

Groper Creek

Groper Creek is a laidback location, where you can sit back, relax and unwind. You can launch your tinnie from the boat ramp, or fish from the jetty. The area is well known for its fantastic fishing and crabbing. Groper Creek is located towards the mouth of the Burdekin River about 15 kilometres from Home Hill. Head out along Groper Creek Road and you'll travel past sugar cane farms, and through a wetland area full of birds and wildlife. Have a look around the Groper Creek settlement, at the huts built high on stumps. The kiosk and the public phone box are also up high. Bring your camera, as these buildings have their own personality! With the caravan park on the banks of the creek, if you decide to stay longer, check in, set yourself up and enjoy the surroundings.

Gubulla Munda

A popular place in the Burdekin for visitors to take photos is located in Plantation Park, Ayr. The giant carpet snake is an impressive feature, and makes a fantastic backdrop. This 60 metre artwork depicts Gubulla Munda, the Aboriginal totem and the protective spirit for the Birri Gubba people. Gubulla Munda holds sacred cultural and spiritual significance to the Traditional Owners. Also, there are several plaques and a memorial stone. These mark the remains of Birri Gubba ancestors re-interred at this sacred site. The Gudjuda Reference Group commissioned the large sculpture Gubulla Munda Dreaming, which was constructed in 2004. It was painted by aboriginal artists. The monument was created to celebrate and promote indigenous culture.

Herbert River Museum

Learn about the history of the Hinchinbrook region and discover a treasure chest of historical artefacts at the Herbert River Museum. Located on Macrossan Street in Halifax, the Museum offers an interesting step back in time and is co-located with the local gallery. For those wanting to view more of their Local History, the Herbert River Museum and Gallery can be found in the old Shaw's Building, Macrossan Street, Halifax.

Hinchinbrook Adventures

Their company provides aerial scenic tours of the Hinchinbrook region. Their scenic tours showcase the regions natural beauty and offers their clients a chance to view all of the natural wonders in a timely and exciting way. They also offer a Helifishing tour into the remote and untouched wilderness of the Herbert River Gorge. This experience is unique to their company and immerses the client into this special location offering a very unique fishing experience. Liddle's also have a Mother ship fishing charter that operates in the magnificent Hinchinbrook Channel fishery. This fishing mecca is renowned for its many species of prized fish. This charter is an awesome way of accessing its many and varied fishing locations.

Historic Shipwreck Dive Guide - Gothenburg

The Gothenburg was bound from Port Darwin to Melbourne via Newcastle with 128 passengers, mail and general cargo. On 23 February 1875 during a storm and high seas, the Gothenburg ran aground on the southern edge of a detached reef, off the entrance to Flinders Channel, near Townsville. The ship's four lifeboats were lowered; however the first two accidentally came adrift and were swept away before passengers could board. A third boat with women and children capsized when others panicked and tried to board. By morning only the masts of the steamer could be seen above the water. Twenty-two passengers were rescued but 106 lives were lost including all 25 women and children and all the officers on board. Shipwreck features include: boilers, deck beams, engines, iron tanks and a winch. The wreck is a habitat for a variety of marine life. A dive guide for the Gothenburg can be downloaded from the Queensland Government website. The Gothenburg is in a protected zone and requires a free permit to dive. The protected zone helps to protect the shipwreck, and its associated relics, from interference and damage. Apply for a permit online at the website listed.

Horseshoe Bay

Horseshoe Bay is the premier location for watersports on Magnetic Island offering activities to excite the whole family. Along the shores of Horseshoe Bay is an array of equipment hire options including jet skis, kayaks, stand up paddle boards and more! The Bay also provides a great swimming enclosure as well as fantastic fishing and sailing opportunities, along with a shady foreshore with magnificent views across the rocky outcrops and blue ocean waters. If you are looking for a new way to explore the Island, why not consider a horseback ride from the bush to the beach. Swim with your horse in the cool clear waters of the Coral Sea and create a memory that will last a lifetime. After getting out on the water, sit back and relax at one of Horseshoe Bay's restaurants, cafes or bars. The selection of shops and eateries along the Horseshoe Bay beachfront is an ideal location for a meal with an ocean view. Alternatively pack a picnic and make use of the sheltered picnic tables while the kids enjoy the nearby playground facilities.

Inkerman Hill

Inkerman Hill, a 10 minute drive south of the township of Home Hill, is currently undergoing an upgrade! With funding received through the Queensland Government's Scenic Lookout Upgrade Program, the Burdekin Shire Council is busy working to bring their valued visitors a more enjoyable experience. The road up to the lookout is being widened and the carpark improved. With a new lookout platform, shelters, toilets, interpretive and directional signage, it will be worth the wait. Although access to Inkerman Hill is not possible at the moment, when the facility is officially re-opened towards the end of 2017, it will be at the top of the to-do list when visiting the region.

Jourama Falls, Paluma Range National Park

A picturesque waterfall on Waterview Creek, rainforest, vine forest and open woodland feature in this popular section of Paluma Range National Park in the foothills of the Seaview Range. Rainforest grows on the higher slopes and fringes the creek. Poplar gum, bloodwood, Moreton Bay ash and cocky apple trees are common in the open woodland. Jourama Falls, Paluma National Park, is within the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area. Jourama Falls in Paluma Range National Park offers beautiful places to relax, camp, walk and enjoy watching birds, butterflies and other native wildlife. Enjoy a picnic in the cool air at the day-use area near the first causeway. In the rainforest along the creek, look for the buff-breasted paradise-kingfisher which arrives here from Papua New Guinea between October and April. Camp at the popular Jourama Falls camping area or take a stroll along the three kilometre return track to view Jourama Falls, Waterview Creek and surrounding rainforest. Look for the distinctive red flowers of weeping bottlebrush trees overhanging the creek, which attract the brilliant blue Ulysses butterfly.

Keeper Reef Dive Site

Located off Townsville, Keeper Reef offers a wonderful dive for those that love to explore healthy coral gardens. It is easy to get lost at this dive site as the coral gardens are divided by ridges and bommies, creating a coral maze. Some of the best corals at Keeper Reef are the beautiful gorgonians and spikey soft corals. Going no deeper than 16 metres divers will see schools of fusiliers, coral trout, rabbitfish, batfish, turtles, whitetip reef sharks, sweetlips and barramundi cod. There are also plenty of ledges to investigate, which are home to crayfish, rock cods, squirrelfish and shrimps.

Lissner Park

While exploring Charters Towers be sure to take the time to discover Lissner Park. Lined with figs, jacarandas, eucalypts, tamarinds, burdekin plum, milky pines, palms and silky oaks, Lissner Park offers an ideal location to enjoy a shady picnic. Facilities and attractions include picnic tables, gas barbecues, Boer War kiosk, band rotunda, children's playground, WWI guns, Gudgal People Yarning Circle, duck pond and memorials to grazier William Hann and pioneer Jupiter Mossman. The Park was named after Isidor Siegfried Lissner who arrived in Charters Towers in 1873. During his time in Charters Towers Lissner developed a financial empire based on mining and commercial interests. He took a keen interest in community affairs and pushed for the establishment of sporting facilities and public amenities including Lissner Park.

Lucinda

Directly opposite the southern tip of World Heritage listed Hinchinbrook Island is the sleepy seaside hamlet of Lucinda. The eye-popping pride of Lucinda is a six kilometre jetty stretching far out into the Coral Sea. The jetty is the world's largest bulk sugar loading facility and is so long it actually curves with the earth. When conditions are right, you can sometimes see the dugongs and sea turtles at play. With the fertile Hinchinbrook Channel to the north and Coral Sea to the east, Lucinda is Shangri-La for keen anglers. Mangrove jack, coral trout, big juicy mud crabs and the fighting barramundi are all in plentiful supply. Hire a boat and head out to sea or try your luck in the estuary, mangroves, off the beach, or over the side of the jetty. Looming large off the coast, breathtaking Hinchinbrook Island is a pristine natural wilderness, home to the famous Thorsborne Trail, internationally rated one of the top 10 walks on the planet. From Lucinda you can embark on a Hinchinbrook safari and explore the Island's mist-shrouded mountains, waterfalls and freshwater pools. Accommodation in the area includes motels, hotels, caravans and self-contained cabins.

Lucinda Jetty

Situated near the southern end of World Heritage listed Hinchinbrook Island, the Lucinda bulk sugar terminal boasts the longest service jetty in the Southern Hemisphere. At 5.76 kilometres long, supported by more than 660 concrete and steel pylons, the jetty is nothing short of an engineering masterpiece with its length actually following the curved contour of the earth. Sugar takes 22 minutes to travel along the conveyor from the on-shore storage to the shiploader. The single berth can accommodate fully loaded Panamax class vessels and the major cargo destinations are Canada and Malaysia. The jetty enables Lucinda to receive the largest ships used in the raw sugar trade. Adjacent to this amazing structure is a small service jetty which is popular with anglers who don't have their own boat. Pelagic species such as Spanish mackerel, giant trevally, queenfish, northern bluefin tuna are there for the taking and some anglers have even been lucky enough to land small black marlin.

Magnetic Island Dive Site

Magnetic Island is a popular destination off Townsville for day trips or an extended stay. The island has many sheltered bays that are great to snorkel or dive, as they have a surprising amount of coral and some great marine life. Florence Bay, Arthur Bay, Alma Bay, Nelly Bay and Geoffrey Bay are all popular dive sites with a good variety of hard and soft corals in depths to 10 metres. The coral gardens in these bays are home to a wide range of reef fish and also a good place to see stingrays, crayfish, moray eels, nudibranchs, wobbegong sharks and the occasional epaulette shark. In Geoffrey Bay divers can also explore the wreck of the Moltke, a 50 metre long three-mast barque scuttled in 1911. The wreck rests in 8 metres, 100 metres off the beach, and is covered in corals and fish.